Article Title

Safety and efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in ALS: Randomised controlled study

Abstract

Objective: Neuroinflammation is an important pathogenic mechanism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediating a slower rate of disease progression. Dimethyl fumarate enhances Treg levels and suppresses pro-inflammatory T cells. The present study assessed the safety and efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in ALS.

Methods: Phase-2, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised clinical trial recruited participants from May 1, 2018 to September 25, 2019, across six Australian sites. Participants were randomised (2:1 ratio) to dimethyl fumarate (480 mg/day) or matching placebo, completing visits at screening, baseline, weeks 12, 24 and 36. The primary efficacy endpoint was a change in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) at week 36. Secondary outcome measures included survival, neurophysiological index (NI), respiratory function, urinary neurotrophin-receptor p75 and quality of life.

Results: A total of 107 participants were randomised to dimethyl fumarate (n = 72) or placebo

(n = 35). ALSFRS-R score was not significantly different at week 36 (-1.12 [-3.75 to 1.52, p = 0.41]). Dimethyl fumarate was associated with a reduced NI decline week 36 (differences in the least-squares mean: (0.84 [-0.51 to 2.22, p = 0.22]). There were no significant differences in other secondary outcome measures. Safety profiles were comparable between groups.

Interpretation: Dimethyl fumarate, in combination with riluzole, was safe and well-tolerated in

ALS. There was no significant improvement in the primary endpoint. The trial provides class I evidence for safety and lack of efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in ALS.

Keywords

randomised controlled study, dimethyl fumarate, safety, efficacy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

Link to Publisher Version (URL)

10.1002/acn3.51446

This document is currently not available here.

Find in your library

Share

COinS