Abstract

Fewer than 20% of older adults participate in strength training (ST). Barriers to ST participation include not knowing where to go or not having someone to go with. To address these barriers, the authors provided older adults with a peer (older person already participating in ST) to support their engagement. The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to determine whether older adults who were provided with a peer when participating in ST were more likely to be participating in ST 4 weeks postintervention, compared with those receiving ST alone. Fifty-one ST participants were recruited; 40 completed the intervention and postintervention data collection (78.4%). Providing peer support with ST did not significantly increase ST participation (p = .775). However, both groups made significant improvements over time in lower-limb strength and mobility. Participants in either group who continued the ST program (55%) had made additional significant improvements in lower-limb strength and mobility.

Keywords

buddy, mentor, resistance training, seniors

Comments

This is the accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from Journal of Aging and Physical Activity (2020), https://doi.org/10.1123/japa.2019-0284

© 2019-2020 Human Kinetics

Link to Publisher Version (URL)

10.1123/japa.2019-0284

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