UNDA Affiliation

yes

Abstract

Analytic epistemologists agree that, whatever else is true of epistemic justification, it is distinct from knowledge. However, if recent work by Jonathan Sutton is correct, this view is deeply mistaken, for according to Sutton justification is knowledge. That is, a subject is justified in believing that ρ iff he knows that ρ. Sutton further claims that there is no concept of epistemic justification distinct from knowledge. Since knowledge is factive, a consequence of Sutton’s view is that there are no false justified beliefs.

Following Sutton, I will begin by outlining kinds of beliefs that do not constitute knowledge but that seem to be justified. I will then be in a position to critically evaluate Sutton’s arguments for his position that justification is knowledge, concluding that he fails to establish his bold thesis. In the course of so doing, I will defend the following rule of assertion: (The JBK-rule) One must: assert ρ only if one has justification to believe that one knows that ρ.

Keywords

Peer-reviewed

Comments

The author's final version of 'Is Justification Knowledge?' is available for download.

This article may be accessed from the publisher here

The Journal of Philosophical Research may be accessed from the National Library of Australia here

University Copyright.pdf (130 kB)
University of Notre Dame Australia Copyright Statement

Share

COinS