Abstract

Objective: There is limited research on fathers in the setting of maternal teenage pregnancy. Most studies report data from regions of social disadvantage and low education. We report on the levels of anxiety, depression and quality of life of fathers in the setting of maternal teenage pregnancy in an area where the unemployment rate is low.

Methods: Observational study of 50 fathers in the setting of maternal teenage pregnancy and 100 fathers whose partners were not teenagers (control), living within the same metropolitan healthcare region with high employment rates. Fathers were enrolled within the larger Australian Father’s Study and were recruited from antenatal clinics and community settings. Researchers administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale and demographic questionnaires.

Results: Fathers in the setting of maternal teenage pregnancy were significantly younger than control fathers (p<0.05). After adjusting for demographic variables, fathers in the setting of maternal teenage pregnancy did not have levels of anxiety, depression or quality of life that were significantly different to control fathers.

Conclusion: Fathers in the setting of maternal teenage pregnancy, when engaged in further education or employment have levels of anxiety, depression and quality of life comparable to control fathers.

Keywords

teenage pregnancy, teenage fathers, education, hospital anxiety and depression scale, satisfaction with life scale, quality of life

Link to Publisher Version (URL)

http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2161-038X.1000161

Share

COinS