Article Title

Fish-oil supplementation in pregnancy does not reduce the risk of gestational diabetes or preeclampsia

Abstract

Background: There is uncertainty regarding the efficacy of increasing n−3 long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) intake during pregnancy in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and preeclampsia.

Objectives: The objective was to determine whether n−3 LCPUFA supplementation in pregnancy reduces the incidence of GDM or preeclampsia. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of n−3 LCPUFA supplementation on perinatal complications.

Design: This was a double-blind, multicenter randomized control trial—the DHA to Optimize Mother Infant Outcome (DOMInO) trial. Pregnant women (n = 2399) of

Results: The overall incidences of GDM and preeclampsia were 8% and 5%, respectively, based on clinical diagnosis. The RR of GDM was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.74, 1.27) and of preeclampsia was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.25), and they did not differ significantly between the groups. Birth weight, length, and head circumference z scores also did not differ between the groups. There were 12 perinatal deaths and 5 neonatal convulsions in the control group compared with 3 perinatal deaths and no neonatal convulsions in the DHA group (P = 0.03 in both cases).

Conclusion: DHA supplementation of 800 mg/d in the second half of pregnancy does not reduce the risk of GDM or preeclampsia. Whether supplementation reduces the risk of perinatal death and neonatal convulsions requires further investigation.

Keywords

peer-reviewed

 

Link to Publisher Version (DOI)

http://doi.org/10.3945/​ajcn.111.033217