Article Title

Reducing unmet needs: A prevocational medical training program in public health medicine and primary health care in remote Australia

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the development and implementation of a prevocational medical training program in public health medicine and primary health care in remote Australia and to evaluate the program's adherence to adult learning principles.

Methods: Reports, funding applications and other relevant material relating to the program were reviewed to document learning objectives, and teaching and program implementation strategies.

Results: The 24-week program employs two prevocational medical practitioners each year and comprises four weeks at Fremantle Hospital's sexual health clinic followed by 20 weeks in the Kimberley. Curriculum objectives include clinical and public health aspects of sexually transmitted infection management, immunisation, clinical audit and quality improvement, primary health care in remote Aboriginal communities, oral and written presentation skills and working as part of an interdisciplinary team. Teaching strategies used were in accordance with adult learning principles.

Conclusions: Prevocational medical training in public health medicine and primary health care in remote Australia is achievable and reduces current gaps in prevocational medical education.

Keywords

Aboriginal health, medical education, population health, primary health care, rural/ remote area health

 

Link to Publisher Version (DOI)

http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1854.2005.00698.x